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AMY BENNET AT ARMONY NYC

Posted on March 11, 2013 by admin

How beautiful was New York these days that The Armory was on. Fairs, openings, art crowd and collectors, all moving  forward in Manhattan: selling, promoting , running up and downtown, closing deals during dinners at the most desiderable restaurants. Of course you have the perception that everthing is there to be sold as it has to be, but for us, no money collectors, is good to buy and store works of art in our minds. For us NMC, such few days of “art world reuinion ” is a gift. They can talk as bad as they want about art fairs, but the only way of divining into contemporary is just that, going to a fair. Among all the artists featured this year, I literally fell in love with Amy Bennet. Her paintings are narrative, evocatve, exquisite. “I am interested in storytelling over time through repeated depictions of the same house or car or person, seasonal changes, and shifting vantage points. Like the disturbing difficulty of trying to put rolls of film in order several years after the pictures have been taken, I hope the collective images suggest a known past that is just beyond reach. I intend for the tiny scale to enhance an urge for more information. Similar to a memory, they are fictional constructions of significant moments and distillations of experience. One of my challenges is to invite the viewer to form his or her own connection and narrative so that he may empathize with the occupants’ seemingly mundane existence. Working with common themes such as transition, aging, isolation, and loss, I am interested in the fragility of relationships and the awkwardness of a group of people trying to coexist and relate to one another. As I transitioned my model into winter, snowbanks of increasing depth seemed to fortify a sense of isolation and quietness. The paintings portray both the magical and suffocating potential of snow, the wonder at its stark beauty and the hopelessness that spring might never come”.

http://www.amybennett.com/home.html

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CUT THE RIBBON, YAYOI KUSAMA

Posted on January 28, 2013 by admin

From rural Japan to technological NYC. She can paint, creates collage, makes sculpures, performances, environmental installations, book illustrations. She is the queen of dots, pois, or better she has cut the ribbon as first Japanese female psychedelic performer. Even though forgotten after leaving the early NYC’s pop scene in the 70’s, Yayoi Kusama is now widely acknowledged. Maybe one of Japan’s most important living artist and avant garde voice.Yayoi Kusama started creating art at an early age and became interested in the European and American avant garde.It was 1957 when she moved to the US, settling in NYC where she produced a series of paintings influenced by the abstract expressionist movement. Kusama became a fixture of the New York avant-garde, having her works exhibited with the likes of Andy Warhol and embracing the rise of the early hippie movement of the late 60s.She, for instance, organised a series of Body Festivals in which naked participants were painted with brightly colored polka dots. In 1973, Kusama moved back to her native Japan, where she found the art scene far more conservative than New York. There she became an art dealer and continued to produce artworks in a variety of mediums, as well as launching a literary career by publishing several novels, a poetry collection and an autobiography. I personally admire and adore her Alice in Wonderland’s illustrations. Kusama’s conceptual art shows feminism, minimalism, surrealism and is infused with autobiographical, psychological, and sexual content.Her obsessiveness in repeating dot patterns seem to assert the desire to escape and the viewer of her obsessive vision of endless dots gets inprisoned in a maniac net, where the only thing to do is to be submerged. Nowadays Yayoi Kusama lives and works in Tokyo.

GUTAI

Posted on January 10, 2013 by admin

In February 2013, the Guggenheim Museum will open the first U.S. museum retrospective exhibition ever devoted to Gutai, the most influential artists collective and artistic movement in postwar Japan and among the most important international avant-garde movements of the 1950s and ‘60s. Gutai was an association of artists founded by Jiro Yoshihara in Japan in 1954. The ’50s and ’60s, the period during which Gutai emerged, were notable for Japan’s miraculous recovery, which was achieved through soaring economic growth in the wake of the country’s defeat in World War II. Gutai’s creations are the result of an abundance of the challenging spirit and creative energy and the function of the group as a symbol of that era. Gutai was extraordinary for its range of bold and innovative creativity and aesthetic which explored in a unique way materials, processes and performativity. The group had a radical way of experimentation across a range of media and styles, and demonstrated how individual artists could push the limits of art. The range will include paintings, conceptual art, experimental performances and films. The Guggenheim show will contain 120 objects by 25 artists on loan from major museum and private collections in Japan, the U.S. and Europe.

 http://www.guggenheim.org/

15 Feb – 8 May, 2013 Guggenheim Museum, NYC

EVERYTHING CHANGES BUT NOTHING CHANGES : POPSPOTS

Posted on July 24, 2012 by Luca Andriani

There are locations which become famous, memorable for having been portrayed for different purposes and that made the story of an event, told an emotion, a moment in the life of each one of us. Despite the years have passed and with them has changed society, customs, lifestyle, these locations have retained their charm and their immutability.These photomontage images by photographer Bob Egan are a sea of nostalgia. The photographer is inspired by all kinds of historical pop culture events and, referring to himself as a “pop culture/rock and roll detective,” Egan tracks down locations across mainly New York City to visually recreate various moments. Specifically in this series, the photographer is influenced by original vinyl covers of popular musicians. Based on a ton of research and investigation, he identifies where an album cover photo was taken, visits the location, and then uses Photoshop to merge the old cover images with new snapshots of each place. All of Egan’s creations are featured on his website, PopSpots. The photographer says, “Manhattan is constantly being torn down and rebuilt anew, and I’m trying to find these places while they are still around.” Not only does he feature well known musicians like Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, and Neil Young throughout New York City but, out of curiosity, he also seeks out scenes from all kinds of famous art and paintings, including Edvard Munch’s The Scream based in Norway.

http://popspotsnyc.com/

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