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ANIMALITA’

Posted on January 28, 2015 by Luisa Fazio

In a lifetime, the need of not feeling alone is physiological, especially in our domestic space. Who has not welcomed home a chubby pig-shaped piggy bank or a stinging doorstop under the shape of a hedgehog? We loved the company of useful objects but also objects that have renounced their functionality. Do not forget the improbable collection of turtles, elephants and bunnies! Ten established and emerging international designers have intersected their passion for furnishing with love for animals, in a sympathetical and imaginative way. In collaboration with Bosa, Venetian ceramic laboratory, known throughout the world, they have created ANIMAlità: a zoomorphic collection on display at the Triennale Design Museum in Milan. Design objects from animal shapes such as cats, armadillos, beetles, toucans, unicorn colorful, funny, ironic, everyday usage but also playful and apotropaic. Animality in the service of matter. The zoo collection is strictly of refined ceramics. Designers have very well passed the risk of running into banality and bad taste. There are no unnecessary and superfluous objects, but only objects that make us feel good, really good.

 

www.triennale.org

 

MY RED LONG GLOVES

Posted on January 13, 2015 by Clara G

Put the blame on Gilda, on her red hair, on those long black satin gloves driving all the attention to her perfect shoulders. Her self-confidence wearing that iconic strapless black dress, the way she sings, the way she dances, sure about her beauty, one glove is on the floor, her movements are deliberately powerful, the dress moves dangerously, somehow is promising to fall down, the camera plays with this effect. Jean Luis created a perfect outfit to build a perfect scene alive and modern since 1946. My gloves are long but not black, they are red. Not satin but wool. Not very tight, they are confortable and warm, they have no label, neither handling instructions, they are beautiful and anonymous.

Gilda smiles, plays, but she is a little sad, she seems to be drunk. There is a little bit of pain. It’s  easy to see the smile of the good girl turned into a femme fatal. Did Rita Hayworth wanted to create Gilda like this or is Rita the one that smiles behind Gilda? You are supposed to be true while dancing, and Rita was a professional dancer. Gilda wearing long gloves has been always on my mind, and of course I have always had a pair of long gloves, always… put the blame on me, I’ll show no repentance, I’ll suffer with pride, finally… I am not Gilda!

CELEBRATING MONOGRAM

Posted on January 13, 2015 by Margherita Nannuzzi

Since the 1970s the photographer Cindy Sherman portrays herself in imitation of cinematographic aesthetic of the 1950s and 1960s in Untitled film still. It is not a self-portrait in the traditional sense but a representation of stereotypes handed down by american and italian cinema: the young woman who arrives in metropolis, the housewife, the unprejudiced (or rather the femme fatale), Alfred Hitchcock’s blonde and woman victim based on the famous image of Anna Magnani. Although it’s a cliché, the pictures are made by an artist and resemble an original but are also fake stereotypes, because the cinema itself produces stereotypes to whom reality tends to look like. The combination of elements like light, make-up, costumes and, especially, types of angles and shots allows us to associate those photographs to films which we have already seen, besides, we are deceived by the female glance, that is always turned elsewhere. Sherman’s photographs seem apparently kitsch, because fashion photography expresses the  concept of “inauthentic” par excellence, but instead Sherman is making us an analysis and a reflection that are typical of modernist avant-garde. The Louis Vuitton maison for its 160 years, has chosen, among various artists, Cindy Sherman for celebrating the iconic Monogram pattern, created in 1896 by Georges Vuitton to pay homage to his  father Louis. Cindy chose the trunk (that she calls “my travel office”) but this time she doesn’t make a self-representation but she uses a model as alter ego. The model takes from the trunk the cosmetics to disguise herself as a clown,  a character become very interested for Sherman in the last ten years. The trunk, a casket enclosing a traveller’s dreams, has been the inspiration for the LV 2014 Winter collection.

VAULTS

Posted on January 8, 2015 by Maxim Deluxe

VAULTS  The  London-based band comes out with the new EP of sweet and melancholic music entitled ‘ Vultures ‘.

Listen on : http://www.entervaults.com/

IMAGE MAKER – GUY BOURDIN

Posted on January 7, 2015 by Isabella Cecconi

UK’s hosting the largest exhibition of photographer Guy Bourdin, influential, enigmatic fashion photographer. The show features over 100 works and previously unseen material from the photographer’s estate, from 1955 to 1987. On display Bourdin’s distinguished 40-year career from Man Ray’s protégé to photography revolutionary in his own right and explore his pursuit of perfection. 

@Somersert House, London – until March the 15th 2015

 

TOAST IT LIKE DARTH!

Posted on January 6, 2015 by Editorial Staff

A striking addiction to any kitchen! Molded in sturdy black plastic and meticulously detailed, it’s obviously the Darth Vader Toaster! Two pieces of bread and Vader ejects them with his portrait into one side and the “Star Wars” logo into the other. 

Beakfast is going to a darker side! 

www.hammacher.com

 

CUT THE RIBBON: MARTHA GRAHAM

Posted on January 5, 2015 by Editorial Staff

Dance genius Martha Graham studied at the Denishawn School of Dancing and Related Arts before establishing the Martha Graham Centre of Contemporary Dance in 1926. Rejecting classical European ballet, she  searched in primitive societies the inspiration for her spiritual-like naturalistic moves she interpreted bare feet. Her innovative dance had, the most long-lasting influence on contemporary performance. Deeply influenced by the political climate, she could be considered the ‘Picasso of dance’. A woman who made her modern dance popular in a country she so strongly analysed and represented, creating a unique ‘American experience’.As she used to say : ‘nothing is more revealing than a movement.’